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Andrew Rev Back In News: Youngblood  

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dan2448
(@dan2448)
Active Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 11
05/08/2019 8:45 am  

Nearly a decade ago on this forum, the "Elementals" comic book was discussed at some length, including its connection to V&V, as well as a the demise and long purgatory of the title following its sale in the early 1990s by Bill Willingham to a man named Andrew Rev, whom no one seemed to know a lot about.

Well, a few days ago, his name seems to have re-emerged in 'comic book news,' after Rob Liefeld revealed that nearly 20 years ago he had apparently split up and sold off the rights to all his Image/Awesome characters.  One of those rights acquirors apparently made a subsequent deal in the last year or so with Andrew Rev, including the rights to "Youngblood."

https://comicbook.com/comics/2019/08/02/rob-liefeld-says-he-cant-legally-do-anything-with-youngblood/

The way the rights are described by Liefeld in his post, and in this (and other) news articles about it seems a little confused/vague/inconsistent to me.  I'm not sure whether that's due to a simple lack of legal sophistication by the writers, or wether 'someone' is not revealing the entire truth publicly. 

But it seems that Rob Liefeld was in financial difficulty in 1999/2000 sufficient for him to sell off rights to his creator-owned characters, including Youngblood, just a few years after Youngblood was such an industry-shaking hit in 1992/1993. 


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Majestic
(@majestic)
Trusted Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 74
11/09/2019 2:40 pm  

I somehow missed this when you originally posted it, Dan.

It does seem that Mr. Rev intentionally buys up properties, just to sit on them and not actually use them.

Though Liefeld has created some decent characters over the years, his lack of artistic talent (there was a time I actually liked some of his stuff) has left him as somewhat of a comical (pun intended) joke among fandom.  One friend went by his booth at a convention and 'crop dusted' it, as a way of giving back to him, for all he inflicted on the art world (distorted feet, minuscule waists, and gazillions of pouches, among others).

V&V GM and player since 1982, my current campaign is 29 years old


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dan2448
(@dan2448)
Active Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 11
20/09/2019 6:57 pm  

Totally, Doug.

Reflecting back, it was/is surprising to me how few creator-owned comic books from the 1980s/90s remain creator owned, and/or were really financially successful for their creators/owners, in the end.

"Teenaged Mutant Ninja Turtles" is, I would guess off the top of my head, maybe the most enduringly successful.  But Eastman & Laird had sold the property years ago.   Would #2 be Todd Mcfarlane's "Spawn"?

 


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